Nonsurgical bone spur treatment: Which one is right for you?

The best nonsurgical bone spur treatment will depend on each patient’s unique situation — there is no “one-size-fits-all” solution. If you have been diagnosed with a spinal bone spur, your physician will likely suggest a regimen of conservative therapies to address your symptoms and maximize your mobility.

What are bone spurs?

Spinal bone spurs themselves are not painful or hazardous to your health. They are simply small, smooth growths that may develop on the spine’s facet joints or the endplates of the vertebrae as a result of aging, injury or everyday wear and tear. The issue with bone spurs is their tendency to compress surrounding spinal nerves and cause excess friction. This can lead to pain, stiffness, numbness, tingling sensations and weakness in the spine or extremities.

What are my nonsurgical bone spur treatment options?

Here’s the good news — many patients are able to improve their condition and find relief from their symptoms without surgery or invasive treatments. Your ideal course of bone spur treatment will depend on the specific location of the spurs and what symptoms you are experiencing, but many treatment plans include an individualized combination of:

  • Alternating use of cold compresses and heating pads
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Low-impact exercise
  • Gentle stretching
  • A healthy, nutrient-rich diet
  • Periodic rest

Some patients also explore alternative bone spur therapies, such as yoga, acupuncture and essential oils. Be sure to consult with your physician, though, before trying an alternative course of care.

Laser Spine Institute offers minimally invasive outpatient procedures to patients whose symptoms remain severe despite rounds of conservative bone spur treatment. If you would like to learn about our procedures, which are performed by board-certified surgeons+ and involve less risk than traditional open spine surgery^, contact us today. A member of our team will be happy to answer any questions you may have and help determine if you are a potential candidate for treatment.